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Prolonging Your Teeth Whitening

How to Prevent Discolouration of Whitening

 

Tooth whitening is still a popular and effective way to brighten Your Smile without removing any of your natural tooth surface. With all the commercial and dental professional whitening solutions available, your choices are many.

 

Cost           Treatment time           Effectiveness

These are the top 3 things that most people will consider when choosing a whitening product. Very few of us have brilliantly white teeth and there are many things that can cause discolouration of the surface enamel including aging.

 

How light will it go and How long will it last???

These are the 2 most commonly asked questions about whitening: How light will the teeth become and how long can they expect the brighten to stay.

Not every person achieves the same results. Most people get great results, while others are not as satisfied. Some people have to try different products or methods until they find the one that works best for them. While still other, do not follow after-care recommendations that can prevent or slow down the re-staining of teeth.

How Light Can I Go?

How much your teeth will lighten depends on a number of factors. The effectiveness of whitening will vary from person to person and product to product.

 

In general:

1) Some kits come with a shade guide so you can determine your existing teeth colour before whitening then do an after-treatment comparison.

2) Teeth with grey undertones do not lighten as well as yellow teeth do

3) Depending on the product of choice, teeth should improve 3-6 shades lighter

4) If you are not happy with the whitening results after trying different products/methods then you may want to consider dental veneers.

5) How effective a commercial product is will depend on the amount of whitening agent (usually hydrogen peroxide) it contains.

 

 

How Long Will It Last?

Again, this varies from person to person. Some people whiten once/month, while others once/year. Some people say that anything that can stain a white shirt may stain teeth. So, basically, if you’re not whitening, your darkening.

 

You can keep your teeth whiter for longer by following these tips:

1) Avoid foods that stain teeth such as richly pigmented wines/juices/ fruit/vegetables/spices like turmeric/balsamic/condiments/soya sauce

2) Avoid or cut down on coffee/tea which contain tannins that stain.

3) Use a straw if you would like your richly coloured drink to bypass your teeth.

4) Rinse your mouth immediately after eating. Do not brush, however, for at least 20minutes. Your teeth may still be soft from bacterial acid attacks and you may scratch enamel surface. Food pigments can hide in these scratched areas.

5) Acidic foods and drinks can cause etching to your enamel surface increasing the likelihood of more staining

6) Avoid abrasive toothbrushes and toothpastes that can abrade teeth and ruin their protective coating.

7) Some foods can create a protective coating over your teeth – like cheese. You can eat then before eating foods you think may stain your teeth.

8) Good oral hygiene is a must to keep unsightly plaque from accumulating which also picks up stains from the food/drinks we consume.

9) Understand, the bacteria acids can erode and pit teeth which allows a place for food stains to accumulate.

10) Check food labels. Many foods have colourants you may not even be aware of.

11) Some whitening systems include a touch-up kit that allows you to do a quick lightening at intervals.

Other Considerations:

Sensitivity – We always recommend that our patient brush with a toothpaste for sensitive teeth. This is because sometimes the whitening process can make teeth and even gums feel sensitive, even painful. Using a Sensitive Toothpaste will help reduce the likelihood of sensitivity or reduce it dramatically. This will allow you to perform the treatment for the recommended length of time without interruption or discomfort.

 

Clean Teeth – We also advise that you have your teeth professionally cleaned before whitening. By doing so, your dental professional will be able to remove some surface staining during the polishing procedure and tartar (calculus) that you already have on your tooth surface. You will ideally like to have the whitening solution contact enamel surface without having to penetrate through hard stone tartar.

 

Origin – Know where your whitening product comes from and it’s ingredients if your are purchasing your whitening from anywhere other than a dental office or reputable pharmacy. If you are having in-office bleaching anywhere other than a dental office then be aware of the place of manufacture and ingredients. If you are not able to review the product or care provider properly, then research or ask your dentist before starting treatment.

 

Existing Dental Work – Lastly, some people are disappointed to learn that whitening can only change the shade of existing, natural teeth. Dental restorations, such as crowns, bridges, white fillings and the false teeth on dentures are unaffected by the whitening procedure. If this is the case, you’ll want to speak with your dentist about other treatment options to help brighten your smile.

 

Have more questions about Teeth Whitening?
Give us a call today at (905) 5 SMILES and our friendly team will be happy to help you!

 

 

The Your Smile Dental Care Team
(905) 576-4537
(416) 783-3533
http://www.yoursmiledentalcare.com

 


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The Consequence of Missing Teeth

16-03-2015 5-58-09 PMAs dentists, we hate it when we are faced with a situation where a tooth must need to be removed due to disease or injury. We are in the business of saving teeth, so when a tooth must be removed we become concerned for the remaining teeth and how the loss of this tooth will affect them…and it will!

Over time. missing teeth can result in serious complications, if left untreated.

A tooth here, a tooth there.

With the human dentition containing a total of 32 teeth (28 if the wisdom teeth have been removed), it is understandable why some people still believe that it is not essential to replace missing teeth when there are other teeth still left to do the job.

The Domino Effect

The loss of a permanent teeth leads to a whole host of other problems if it is not replaced in a timely manner. If it’s true that a picture paints a thousand words, then let’s look at the one below:

 

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This is a typical scenario when even just one tooth is removed without being replaced.  At first glance, you can see some movement and tipping of surrounding teeth, but it’s the significance of this situation that needs further explanation.

Teeth are arranged in the jaw in such a manner so that they support one another and withstand the chewing forces together as a team. When one is lost without being replaced, it sets into motion a collapsing situation where teeth begin to move out of position and alignment. Convincing patients that are in pain or injured that they need immediate treatment is not difficult because their signs and symptoms are usually sudden and uncomfortable. A situation like this is not often ignored for too long. However, the destabilization that occurs with dental collapse happens over a period of time. The signs are not as obvious and damage is often taking place silently. It is easy to understand why treatment recommendations are sometimes ignored or postponed.

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1. Supraeruption (Over-eruption)

Although the process is more complex, quite simply put, when teeth first appear in the mouth they emerge out of the bone and gum tissue as their roots and surrounding bone grow and push them out. The only reason they stop is because they meet the teeth that are also emerging in the opposite arch. Their biting surfaces fits into one another like a puzzle and an even distribution of contact throughout the entire dentition allows for proper chewing and equalized forces.

When an opposing lower tooth is lost and not replaced it’s upper partner now has no opposition and begins to adapt to this new space by moving downward. In doing so, it loses contact with it’s neighbouring teeth on either side and begins to bite more heavily with the teeth in the opposing lower arch. The bite is thrown off it’s ability to distribute an equal force among all the teeth, and this can cause headaches, jaw tension, root exposure, tooth breakage, grinding, clenching and wear.

2. Tipping23-03-2015 9-44-50 AM

When a tooth is lost and not replaced, the bone shrinks in the space and the teeth on either side now have a vacant area in which to tip and move into. In doing so, they lose contact with their other adjacent teeth. Teeth are designed to touch one another to prevent food impaction that can damage tissue and cause cavities. If enough of the vacant space becomes occupied by tipping teeth then the space becomes too small to make replacement a viable option without modifying other teeth.

Loss of contact3. Loss of Contact

Teeth that are beside one another contact each other at their greatest bulge (curvature).  Think of the place between two teeth where your floss “snaps” through. This is the contact point. Although gum tissue hides the area underneath, there is actually a space between the gum and the tooth. Your floss cleans out any food and plaque that may accumulate here, but one of the reasons for a curvaceous shape of the tooth crown is to prevent too much food impaction by deflecting food away from this area. When teeth are in alignment with one another, this action works well and efficiently.

4. Plaque and Food Impaction

Aside from the first space that was created by the missing tooth, more spaces begin to develop as adjacent and opposing teeth begin to move out of their original positions. These teeth lose contact with their neighbouring teeth and leave spaces and pockets into which plaque and food can gather. Oftentimes food impaction occurs frequently and can be difficult to remove as the space continues to grow. Plaque and food accumulation leads to cavities, gum and bone destruction and gum disease.

5. Bone Loss

During the formation of teeth, bone grows in and around the root of the teeth for support and nourishment. Teeth are necessary to maintain healthy jaw bone. When a tooth is removed there is no longer the need for bone and it resorbs (shrinks) away. Healthy, dense bone is an important factor when considering the placement of implants for replacement. The longer you leave the space, the smaller the height and width of the bone becomes. Bone loss also occurs in the areas where adjacent and opposing teeth have lost contact with their neighbouring teeth because of the destructive nature of the gum disease process. Even the floor of your sinus bone collapses into spaces where there used to be teeth. Bone loss can significantly impact your chances of becoming a good candidate for any future dental implant placement.
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Complications

Chewing/Nutrition – When teeth are missing, we chew in the areas of the mouth where teeth are present. Sometimes, people have to use teeth that are smaller, more slender and not designed for the chewing capacity of large molars. Other times, remaining teeth are loose or uncomfortable to use. As the dentition collapses over time, chewing can become difficult and nutritional deficiencies arise.

Gum Disease – Gum disease is a process that happens over time and is usually silent until a lot of destruction is done. Missing teeth create the perfect condition for gum disease to form and progress. Teeth stabilize one another and protect the gum tissue that surround them. In turn, the gum tissue and ligaments protect and secure the tooth to the bone socket. When teeth move and create spaces, food and plaque begin to accumulate in the spaces under the gum and eventually destroy enough tissue to create a pocket into which more food and plaque can gather. Cleaning out this pocket can be difficult and the space continues to grow destroying gum and bone along the way. When enough tissue is lost the tooth starts becoming loose and you may face the loss of another tooth. Gum disease and tooth loss can be a vicious cycle. Trying to control and correct all of the factors that allow this disease process to progress can be exasperating.

23-03-2015 10-41-47 AMBone level in an unhealthy and healthy mouth

Increased food and plaque accumulation – When teeth lose contact with one another the space that forms between them allows for food to easily collect in the area. Food impaction can injure 23-03-2015 11-32-01 AMgum tissue and cause bad breath. Continual food impaction can cause cavities, destroys gum tissue and surrounding bone creating large pocketing into which more debris can gather. Because this cycle of destruction happens below the gum line, it can go unnoticed for a long time. Only regular visits to the dentist will allow you to get baselines charted and monitored.

Tooth Decay – With increased food impaction comes a higher incidence of tooth decay. Food impaction can become a chronic situation. You will likely feel the need to floss after almost every meal and food can become submerged so far into the gum pocket that it becomes difficult to removed. Decay can go unnoticed until pain or a dental exam.

Sinus collapseSinus Collapse – When an upper tooth is removed, over time, the floor of the sinus begins to collapse into the space where the tooth root used to occupy interfering with the space needed for a future dental implant.

Root Exposure – The root of the tooth is covered with a tissue that is much less calcified and more sensitive than enamel. As a tooth moves out of it’s position when it over-erupts or tips more of the root tissue will become exposed. Patients often notice more sensitivity to hot and cold sensations and a higher incidence of cavities along this softer root portion of the tooth.

Muscle Tension – When remaining teeth move out of alignment the whole bite can be thrown off. Forces may not be evenly distributed among the teeth and some teeth may meet before the others do when chewing. This imbalance causes extra stress on facial muscles and joints (TMJ) that are also compensating. Tense muscles results in headaches, neck pain, earaches, upper back and shoulder discomfort.

TMJ – An uneven bite can quickly become a TMJ issue. Clicking, popping jaw joints, grating sounds, pain in the cheek muscles and uncontrollable jaw or tongue movements are not uncommon side affects of the missing teeth.

Fracture – The uneven bite that can occur with missing teeth often causes a few teeth to bear the biting forces that should ideally be shared by all teeth. This overload of forces can cause teeth to chip and fracture. If a fracture runs through the tooth and into the root surface then the tooth cannot be save. Unfortunately, it will become another tooth that must be removed.

Facial Collapse – Our face shape and size changes as we age and although facial collapse is usually more pronounced in someone who has lost most or all of their teeth, patients who have lost several teeth may begin to notice a “caved” in look to their face compared to others of their own age group who have more teeth.

 

Treatment Options

Fortunately, there are several treatment options available for missing teeth that will restore the beauty and function to your mouth. It used to be that dental bridges were the most common way to replace missing teeth. Nowadays, thanks to advanced technology, dental implant are the most permanent, long term treatment solution.

Dental Implants are so effective that many of our patients who choose this option tell us that their implant is completely undistinguishable from their other natural teeth in both appearance and function!

Been a while?

Ignoring the certainty of dental collapse now will eventually leave you facing more extensive and expensive dentistry in the future. Your options will also be limited if you experience bone loss and collapse over the years. If it was many years ago that your had teeth removed and are wondering what can be done now, don’t delay any further. Your dentist will evaluate your dentition and let you know if your bite can still be restored and any missing teeth replaced.

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Yours in Better Dental Health,
The Your Smile Dental Care Team
(905) 576-4537
(416) 783-3533


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White Spots

Q: I have two white spots on my upper front teeth that I’ve had my whole life. I’ve tried bleaching with teeth whitening products, but they’re still there. What can I do to get rid of them?

Turners Tooth
There are a number of circumstances or conditions than can result in areas on the enamel that appear markedly whiter than the rest of the enamel. The photo above clearly shows a distinct round dot that is typical of a condition know as Turner’s Hypoplasia. It is the result of a childhood trauma to the mouth that disturbed the enamel development of an adult tooth as it was forming in the jaws at the time of accident.

09-11-2015 3-57-36 PMInjury to a child’s mouth can occur quite easily especially when they are beginning to crawl/walk and explore the world around them. Ten permanent (adult) teeth develop in the jaw bone immediately below the ten primary (baby) teeth that they will eventually replace. Even though you cannot see the adult teeth, injuries to the baby teeth can affect the health and development of these important replacement teeth.

If, during a fall, the child’s mouth is injured, one of the primary teeth may make contact with the facial (and sometimes the palatal) side of an upper front permanent (adult) tooth with enough force to interfere with the cells that are forming the adult enamel on that particular tooth. Injuries such as this usually occur before three years of age.

The disturbance can result is a round whitish, sometimes yellowish spot in a specific location which corresponds to where the baby tooth “banged into” the adult tooth and mineralization was impaired before it was completely finished forming. This spot is visible when the adult tooth comes into the mouth and usually affects only one tooth in the mouth.

Diagnosis and Treatment

There are other causes of Hypoplasia that can leave the enamel weak and more susceptible to the cavity process. If the size and depth of the spot is minimal, it can usually be fixed quite easily. The dentist will first identify and determine the cause of the white spot, ensure that more teeth aren’t affected and that it isn’t an indication of a more serious condition. If the area of concern is only cosmetic in nature there are two common remedies:

Microbrasion – If the affected area of the enamel is very superficial in depth then a conservative procedure called microbrasion can be done. A very minute layer on the affected enamel is removed using an acidic/abrasive mixture with some products having a bleaching agent added to their formula. The amount of enamel that is removed during microabrasion is minuscule and unnoticeable, however, there is a risk that the resulting thinner more translucent enamel may allow the darker coloured dentin to shine through causing the new surface colour to also appear darker. If your dentist is planning on adding a whitening procedure to this treatment in an attempt to better match the affected spot to the same colour as your natural tooth shade, they may decide to wait several weeks since it takes this long for surface remineralization to occur.

Filling – If the damaged enamel penetrates further into the tooth then the area can be fixed with a tooth-coloured resin filling material. Your dentist will choose a shade of enamel coloured dental filling material that most closely matches the white shade of your natural tooth. The white spot will be removed and replaced with this dental material then buffed to a high glossy finish for a natural-looking, glossy sheen.

Turner's Treatment
Veneer
– If the tooth is spotted with several larger areas of discolouration, yet the integrity of the tooth’s crown is still very sound, then a matching porcelain dental veneer can be place over the entire frontal portion of the tooth somewhat like a false nail is attached to finger nails.

Considerations

22-12-2014 12-03-57 PMIt is important to understand that there are other, more serious reasons for white spotting on the teeth that are not just a matter of cosmetic concern, but a problem that can leave the enamel susceptible to further damage and deterioration.

Oftentimes, parents do not realize that their child has sustained a dental injury until obvious signs and symptoms appear such as an infectious gum boil, loose tooth or darkened enamel. Some dental injuries, if left untreated, can lead to damage of the developing adult teeth.

If your child has sustained an injury and you suspect that it may have affected one or more of their teeth it should be evaluated by your dentist as soon as possible.  An examination will determine the severity of the injury, if immediate treatment is necessary or if it is a situation that should be monitored.

Our smiles are important to us which is why even small imperfections on our teeth can be bothersome. As the demand for perfect smiles continue to increase, so do the improvements in dental materials and techniques making it easier for us to restore Your Smile.  In fact, it’s a simple as a call to (905) 5SMILES. 🙂

Yours in Better Health,
Dr. Sam Axelrod and Associates
(905) 576-4537
(416) 783-3533
www.yoursmiledentalcare.com

 

 

 

 

 


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Are Implants Right For Me?


It’s hard to believe but dental implants are not the new, they have been around for over 50 Years!

Where people once chose more traditional options such as bridges or dentures, today, they are now more likely to opt for dental implants to replace one or more missing teeth or to support dentures. This is by far a superior option as implants don’t have to be attached to healthy adjacent teeth which would usually have to be cut down and sacrificed to “bridge the gap” created by a missing tooth. When an implant is placed, it is essentially replacing the root of the missing natural tooth, and in doing so, prevents the loss of remaining jawbone.

Bone integrity is essential for a healthy dentition!


But I have other teeth….

The adult dentition can have up or 32 teeth, so it is understandable why some people would believe that one or two missing teeth shouldn’t make that much of a difference, but it does!  Even a single missing tooth compromises the support of the other surrounding teeth and bone leading to dental collapse.

The forces of chewing are meant to be distributed among all of the teeth.  Teeth that are shaped and designed for biting into food do not have the bone support that is required for chewing and grinding. Expecting them to do the work of larger teeth, such as molars, will eventually cause them to break, wear down and become loose. This is an example of such a situation:

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We have found over the years that most people have never really become accustomed to having missing teeth nor the dentures or bridges that were designed to replace them. There are many people who simple refuse to wear the dentures they paid for and that is unfortunate. We’ve had patients come to see us about implants who have been “chewing” with their gums for years.  And oftentimes, people are not diligent in maintaining the level of dental care that is required for bridges. This can lead to bone loss, gum disease, loose bridges, tooth decay under bridges, broken anchor teeth, and eventually – more missing teeth!

Implants are literally changing the quality of  people’s lives!

For some, conventional dentures can be a terrible nuisance and can cause the wearer a lot of aggravation.  Bone loss associated with the prolonged use ofHidden Smile - Copy dentures is inevitable. With your jawbone constantly changing shape and becoming smaller with age, dentures need to be relined constantly to adapt to these changes. Mouth sores associated with dentures can be annoying and paying for dentures that you are not using is no solution at all!

Are your dentures loose and ill-fitting? Are you constantly worried about keeping them in your mouth while you chew or speak? Dental Implants can be inserted to stabilize and support your dentures and are literally changing the way people’s ability to enjoy life.

If you are missing out on life because of missing teeth and would like to regain the ability to eat and speak with confidence give us a call today at (905) 5SMILES to book your no-obligation consultation. We have been in the smile business for over 30 years and are experienced at listening to your expectations and discussing your options.

See if Dental Implants are Right for You!

 

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Do your teeth deserve royal treatment?

Everybody would like to feel like a king or queen now and again wouldn’t they? Well, we think your teeth are special and we would like to see you enjoy them for a lifetime. This may require you to have a crown – Fit for a Tooth!

Why has my dentist recommended a crown for my tooth?

As you age your teeth age too. When cavities, large fillings, trauma and even normal chewing habits cause your teeth to breakdown over time, your dentist can give it a new lease on life by advising that a protective, artificial, covering called a dental crown or cap be placed over the tooth. A crown is tooth-shaped and fits over a weakened tooth to protect it from further deterioration or fracture. A crown is recommended after root canal treatment and is also placed over dental implants.

So, what’s involved?
Normally, you will require two dental appointments to complete a crown procedure. Your first visit is the preparation stage where a thin layer is removed from all sides of your tooth creating a space to allow for the crown to fit properly. In some instances, a tooth may be fractured or have areas of decay which may have to be repaired first with filling material to better support the new crown.

Next, to make sure that the crown will fit precisely, the dentist makes a model (impression) of your tooth using a putty-like material and a plastic, temporary cap is inserted to protect the newly prepared tooth. The impression is then sent to a lab where a dental technician makes an exact replica of your tooth and from that a custom-fitted, permanent crown is made.

On your second visit the temporary crown is removed and the permanent crown is placed. If necessary, it may have to be adjusted to achieve a proper fit and bite. If all is satisfactory, your dentist will permanently cement the crown in place.

Can’t I just get another filling instead?
Crown are the most suitable treatment for a tooth that has already been weakened to the point where it is no longer strong enough to support a filling long term.  Restoring a tooth with just a filling instead of a crown may cause the tooth to fracture beyond repair and unfortunately, the tooth has to be removed.

Yippee! Now that I have a crown I can’t get any more cavities!
Wrong! It is important to remember that your real tooth is still underneath this crown. Dental crowns do not prevent cavities from occurring. Plaque can still collect at the edge of the crown where it meets your tooth. Without proper oral hygiene and good dietary habits, the bacteria in the plaque can still cause decay. Your new dental crown will need to be examined at your regular dental checkups to make sure it is still fitting properly, that it is being kept cleaned and to ensure that the surrounding gum tissue is healthy.

Your Smile Dental Care Patient Education Video

How long will my crown last?
The longevity of your crown depends largely on how well you take care of your teeth , on the amount of wear and tear your teeth are subjected to, your dietary habits, and the health of the supporting tooth and gum. Typically, a crown should last 5-15 years. A well-cared for crown can last many years to prolong the life of your tooth!

It may not be the kind of crown you were hoping for, but at Your Smile Dental Care we will still give you the royal treatment and provide your tooth with the attention it deserves by encircling it, covering all it’s flaws and restoring it to it’s full glory! And if you have a UFC fighter in you – Yes, we do gold too!

Does Your Smile need some TLC? Call us today and we’ll help you “Pick your Bling!”

(905) 576-4537
(905) 5 SMILES