Your Smile Dental Care


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What is a Dental Specialist?

 

Why is my dentist is referring me to a dental specialist?

 

Although a general practitioners may recommend various treatment options for the care of your teeth and supporting structures and perform many different types of treatment, sometimes they may refer your care to a dentist who has received extensive training in a particular area of dentistry that is specific to your circumstance.


“Your general dentist is your primary care provider who sees you on a regular basis to ensure your overall health care is monitored on a regular basis.”


There are many branches of dental specialization and becoming a dental specialist requires a additional formal education after graduating and receiving their initial dental degree. From performing complicated oral surgery to realigning crooked teeth, dental specialists each have a particular area of expertise and are a vital source of care when diagnosis or treatment becomes more involved or complicated.

Dental Specialties

Pediatric Dentistry – treatment and management of children

Endodontics – Endo mean inside and this is a specialty cares for the inside, vital part of the tooth called the pulp chamber or commonly referred to as root canal. They also work in and around the root area as these canals branch out and open along the root surface.

Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology – Dental x-rays/images of the head, neck and mouth area,

Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery – is a huge branch of dentistry dealing with issues of the head, neck, jaws, and teeth. Care can range from complicated tooth extraction to surgical improvements to major reconstruction.

Dental Public Health – Promotes oral health and deals with the community at large, especially the marginalized or disadvantaged, through awareness, policy, programs, research, and screening of dental health issues.

Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology – concerns itself with the study and diagnosis of the causes and effects of diseases associated with the oral cavity and surrounding areas.

Prosthodontics – creates and fits artificial replacements for the teeth, mouth, and other parts of the face and head that are missing naturally or due to trauma or disease.

Orthodontics – deals with the diagnosing, prevention and correction of misaligned teeth and jaws.

Periodontics – cares for the diseased supporting structures of the teeth such as gums and bones through prevention, diagnosing, and treatment.

 

General Dentist

Your general dentist is your primary care provider who sees you on a regular basis to ensure your overall health care is monitored on a regular basis. There are many general dentists who are also capable of treating many complicated conditions and may even have further training or significant experience in providing treatment that may be considered a specialty services. There are times, however, when they may determine that your oral issue bears extenuating risks or involves a degree of complication that obligate them to transition your care to a specialist.

 

 

Under most circumstances, a patient can not seek the care of a specialists on their own. Referral is only provided after a general dentist has made a preliminary diagnosis and then decides that consultation with a specialist is necessary.

 

At Your Smile Dental Care, we recommend that everyone should see their general dentist regularly for examinations. How often depends on the state of your personal oral health. Twice a year is advised for most healthy mouths, whereas, if you are at risk or have a history of decay and disease, more frequents exams and cleaning will be recommended. Patients who make oral care a priority, are more likely to enjoy a lifetime of good oral health.

 

Yours in Better Dental Health,
The Your Smile Dental Care team
(905) 576-4537
(416) 783-3533
www.yoursmiledentalcare.com

 


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Choosing Dental Floss

 

So you’ve decided to make flossing an addition to you home oral care routine. Great idea!

Your local pharmacy is be stocked with all kinds of different types of floss and the choices can be confusing.

 

How do you know which one is right for you?

 

Floss comes in different flavours, coatings, sizes, thicknesses, textures and specialized uses. Finding the one that will do the job right and fits your oral health care needs is a conversation that you can have with your dental care provider via telephone or during your next visit.

 

Let’s look at some of the possibilities that may suit your “specific to you situation:

Sensitivity – Understandably, people who suffer with sensitive teeth or bleeding, swollen gums are are reluctant to begin flossing. Finding soft floss or one coated in wax that will slip easily and comfortably between teeth will make the task more manageable. A daily routine of proper brushing and flossing will soon have gums looking pinker and the bleeding will subside. You should arrange to see your dentist, however, if your gums bleed consistently and your teeth are always sensitive. Don’t ignore theses symptoms as they may be signs that something more serious is going on with your dental health.

 

Tight teeth – Oftentimes, people who have teeth that are very tight or close together find that traditional floss will shred when sliding it between teeth or that they have to force it through. This can cause the floss to snap through the contact area too forcibly and possibly injure gum tissue. They can use:

Waxed floss that is coated and more resistant to breaking. The way coating allows it to fit easier between tight spaces.

Glide floss is specially woven with a light wax coating making it strong, shred-resistant and easy to slide between teeth.

 

Wide spaces –  Some people have teeth with gaps or they are spaced further apart that normally. Superfloss with it’s unique design can be used for wide areas between teeth, braces, and bridgework. It is made up of 3 parts:

1. A stiff string to help thread the floss through or into an area (floss threader)

2. A softer, spongy to gather food particles and plaque more efficiently

3.  A traditional flossed end

 

 

 

Braces: If you wear braces or have dentures, that doesn’t mean that you can’t floss. Try a specialized floss threaders or Superfloss that has a stiff end that you can thread beneath the main wire of your braces and a spongy component that slides easily between the teeth. Your orthodontist will also recommend other dental cleaning tools that will help you clean the particular type of braces that you have.

 

 

Children – It’s harder for children to use floss, so start them off with floss wands. Once their dexterity develops and their teeth become closer together,  you can teach them to use traditional floss. Some creative people have introduced the concept using mega blocks as pictured below:

 

 

 

*Mobility issues – Finding practical dental hygiene solutions for people who have physical or mobility issues can be challenging. They may be caring for their own teeth or may have a caregiver that provides this task. When it comes to flossing, there are electric flossers on the market that help clean in between teeth. A  floss holder/wand, like the one pictured above, or tying floss into a circle for easier handling can also help simplify oral care.

 

Is your floss always shedding or catching on something in between your teeth?

Sometimes, floss can become stuck on something in between teeth making it difficult to remove the floss without breaking or shredding it. Many things can make floss snag including, a broken tooth/filling, a cavity, tartar buildup or an overhanging margins of a filling. Seeing your dental healthcare provider will help identify the problem, and after remedy, they will ensure that the area in question is snag-free so you can resume flossing at home.

 

When to Floss…

Brushing your teeth and using mouth rinse does not replace flossing. Floss goes when your toothbrush can’t reach and mouth rinses are not as effective either. Most people find that flossing once a day, usually before bedtime, is ideal for the. Others, however, get food stuck in between their teeth and under their gums often and need to floss after meals immediately to feel comfort. Finding any time during the day that works best for you is the best time! Once you get the hang of flossing, it only takes a few minutes to include this in your daily hygiene routine, but the benefits last a lifetime!

 

 

Yours in Better Dental Health
The Your Smile Dental Care team
(905) 576-4537
(416) 783-3533
www.yoursmiledentalcare.com

 


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The Do’s and Dont’s of Orthodontic Treatment

Want “Someday” to get here as quickly as possible?

 

One of the first questions a patient will ask their orthodontist during the first visit is, “How long will my treatment last?”

Each mouth is unique, so treatment time will naturally depend on your individual, “specific-to-you situation. Some people require less than a year, while others will be involved in treatment for 3 years or longer.

Initially, most people are eager to begin treatment so that they can have the smile they’ve always wanted as quickly as possible. We don’t think anyone intentionally prolongs the duration of their treatment, but there are, however, a number of things along the way that can complicate and lengthen your time in braces.

Although these following tips may not speed up your time in treatment, they will certainly help to ensure that it will not go slower than predicted or result in additional treatment fees.

Food

Limiting your sugar intake and eating proper foods, while avoiding others is critical during your treatment.  Some people wear single aligning trays that are made of a plastic composite material, while others use the traditional system involving a number of brackets, wires, elastics and bands. These components are fragile and can break easily if not cared for properly. The biggest culprit involved in broken or bent ortho gear is food. When it comes to the foods that you should avoid during treatment, it’s just a matter of using common sense and avoiding those foods that could break, stick to, or otherwise, interfere with your orthodontic work. treatment. Hard, chewy, crunchy, and sticky foods should be avoided during treatment time especially:

  • Fruit roll ups and fruit snacks
  • Sticky or chewy bars, caramel, chocolate, taffy, peanut brittle, etc
  • Pretzels and chips
  • Popcorn
  • Taco shells
  • Hard Cookies
  • Pizza crust
  • Crackers
  • Nuts
  • Chewing Gum
  • Pickles
  • Bagels
  • Hard rolls
  • Beef jerky
  • Ice
  • Ribs
  • Chicken wings and drumsticks
  • Corn on the cob

Some foods can be modified so that they are easier on your bracework. Try cutting them into smaller pieces, softening them in a beverage or cooking them before eating. We know that avoiding the above foods is a tall order, but trust us, your new smile will be worth it.

 

Beverages

Most drinks that we advise you to avoid during ortho treatment are unhealthy for your teeth with or without braces. Drinks that are highly acidic and sugary drinks like soda pop, sports drinks, flavoured milk drinks, sugar-sweetened coffee/tea and fruit juices work to weaken and dissolve tooth enamel and eventually result in tooth decay. How often you consume these types of drinks is the most important factor. An occasional beverage can be tolerated, but allowing the sugars and acids to come in contact with your teeth often and for long periods of time (as in sipping the drink slowly or throughout the day) is a recipe for disaster for any teeth, especially during orthodontic treatment. If you must have a drink of this sort now and again, just remember to drink through a straw and rinse with water afterwards. Wait 20-30 minutes to then brush your teeth.

 

 

Appointments

You will have adjustment appointments scheduled with your orthodontic office at periodic intervals. Missing even just one of these appointments will delay your treatment time, so make sure that your attend every one that is booked for you. Your appointment will be made well ahead of time, so putting the information into your calendar, planner or phone and scheduling all other things around this reserved time will go a long way in helping you keep plan ahead.

 

Dental Hygiene

Bacteria like to accumulate in and around all the nooks and crannies along your tooth’s surface and in between teeth. Adding brackets, bands and wires becomes a virtually jungle gym – giving them all kinds of new places and surfaces to gather and multiply. All of this plaque leads to tooth decay and swollen, bleeding gums, so it is essential that you take your oral hygiene to the next level. Your orthodontist will instruct you on the proper method for keeping your particular type of orthodontia clean. Follow this plan meticulously and always check in the mirror after you’ve brushed to ensure that you haven’t left anything behind. Replace your tooth brushes when they begin to fray (every 2-3 months) since worn brushes are not effective. Using a fluoridated mouth rinse will give added protection and help keep your mouth clean.

 

 

Protection

Straightening your smile with orthodontia is a big investment in terms of cost and time. Protect this investment and avoid costly repairs by safeguarding your teeth during treatment. Although the importance of proper oral hygiene and diet cannot be emphasized enough, defending your teeth and braces during activity is critical and a protective mouth sports guard is a must! The brackets, bands and wires of your orthodontic braces can potentially cut your lips, gums, tongue and other tissues of the mouth during any sudden contact or force. Your orthodontist will make you custom-fitted guards that do not interfere with your braces and are more secure and comfortable than a store bought “one size fits all” type.

Additionally, certain habits like chewing on pencils and fingernails, playing with your braces with your fingers or tongue can also loosen and damage your orthodontia gear. Always call your orthodontist immediately if your have sustained a traumatic injury to your mouth. They will determine if you need to be seen for an examination. Having any broken or loose gear corrected as soon as possible will help you keep your treatment on track!

 

Broken Gear

Sometimes, even with the greatest of care, a part of your orthodontic gear may break or become loose. Although, you may not be in pain or think that it isn’t an urgent matter, waiting to get it fixed may delay your treatment since broken brackets and wires can’t do their job. Call your orthodontist right away and they may want to see you right away or will schedule more time at your next appointment to correct the problem. In the meantime, if there are any parts of your gear that are sharp or protruding, you can find relief by placing some orthodontic wax around the area. If a wire is long and sticking into your gum, lip or cheek, you can try to carefully bend it back down with a Q-tip or pencil eraser so that it runs flat against your tooth. Be careful when eating and brushing so that you do not cause further damage to your braces.

 

Check-ups

ups and cleaning during ortho care. Although your orthodontist is helping you achieve a great smile, they involve themselves with straightening teeth and correcting bites, Your orthodontists does not replace the role of your dentist, who is you primary dental care provider. Keeping your teeth clean is especially challenging when your mouth is full of ortho gear and it takes patience and effort. This makes it even more important to keep up and hygiene appointments where you dentist can monitor your dental health, diagnose problem and then administer treatment accordingly.

 

 

 

 

We know that you want to set things straight with your teeth as quickly as possible. When the day finally comes to get your braces off and reveal your new smile to the world, you want it to be the best it can be. Following these tips may not decrease the time that you have to spend in treatment, but it can certainly help cut down on any delays in treatment.

 

Yours in Better Dental Health
The Your Smile Dental Care team
(905) 576-4537
(416) 783-3533
www.yoursmiledentalcare.com