Your Smile Dental Care


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How to Manage Your Dental Emergency

Be Prepared for the Holidays

We all look forward to the holidays when we can relax with family and friends and enjoy all the great festive foods that the season has to offer. What we don’t expect, however, is a dental emergency! So what are you to do if you find yourself needing a safe home remedy to tie you over until you can get to your dental office?

 

Break a tooth?

Many things can cause your tooth to break including injury, biting down too hard, cavities and large fillings. If you break or chip a tooth your should see your dentist right away. Even a small chip in your tooth can progress into a much more complicated matter and can cause further damage to your tooth, so it is best to have a broken tooth attended to as quickly as possible. Fixing your broken tooth will depend on the extent of damage and how quickly you are able to arrange treatment so that the tooth doesn’t continue to break. Very small chips can sometimes be smoothed off, but fractures extending into the root area may, in some cases, have to be removed

Your at home steps:

1. Rinse your mouth immediately with warm water to remove any small bits and pieces of tooth and other debris.
2. If you are bleeding form the tooth or mouth area, you can use a moistened gauze or clean fabric to stop any bleeding.
3. If you begin to swell, apply a cold compress along the facial side of the injury in a 10 minute on, 10 minute off fashion.
4. You may also want to take an anti-inflammatory to help control any swelling and relieve pain.
5. Call your dentist

 

Lost a filling?

You may not think of a lost filling as an emergency, but it can be a traumatic and even painful experience for many people. Sometimes both the filling and a piece of tooth breaks off, while other times it’s actually just the tooth and not a filling. Fillings do not last forever and may fall out for a number of reasons. Your dentist will examine the area to determine why it fell out and discuss the repair options with you. Do not delay treatment as the tooth may continue to breakdown and could fracture into the root. There are many occasions when teeth that have broken into the root have to be removed. If you know already that you have a weak tooth that could break, have it attended to before it worsens. The sooner you get to the dentist, the better the chance of  saving the tooth.

Your at home steps:

1. Try to locate the piece that fell out and place it in a small baggie for safe keeping. Bring it with you to your appointment.
2. Rinse your mouth immediately with warm water to remove any small bits and pieces of tooth and other debris.
3. If you are bleeding form the tooth or mouth area, you can use a moistened gauze or clean fabric to stop any bleeding.
4. If you begin to swell, apply a cold compress along the facial side of the injury in a 10 minute on, 10 minute off fashion. An anti-inflammatory may also control swelling and relieve pain.
5. You can still eat, but should chew on the opposite side of the mouth from where your filling fell out. Choose softer foods and avoid those that are sharp or extreme in temperature.
6. As for brushing your teeth, you should try to keep the tooth as clean as possible to avoid added irritation, food impaction and plaque/debris buildup. You will want to brush gently with a very soft toothbrush and rinse with warm temperature water.
7. Do not attempt to sand off any sharp edges as you may do further damage to the tooth. Sharp edges can be annoying and bother your curious tongue, so if you have any orthodontic wax or can borrow some, just soften it between your fingers and apply it over the area. Chewing gum may be used also, but may not stick as well.
8. Do not attempt to glue any tooth or filling piece back into place. It will likely not stick and will cause additional work for your dentist.
9. Call your dentist

Crown fall out or becoming loose?

There are a few reasons why a dental crown may become loose and/or fall out such as underlying cavities, old and disintegrating cement, underlying broken tooth, injury/trauma, or the constant habit of grinding/clenching.

Your at home steps:

1. Wrap the crown in a piece of tissue or gauze then place it into a plastic container.

2. Do not attempt to clean off the crown or it may drop onto the floor or down the drain!

3. Rinse your mouth with warm water and spit out into a cup or bowl. This is done to ensure that there isn’t more pieces of tooth of crown in your mouth that you could swallow or aspirate. Retrieve any pieces you think may be a piece of tooth or crown and place in the plastic container.

4. Sometimes, your tooth is left with a sharp edge  when a crown falls off. Do not try to file it down yourself! If you happen to have any orthodontic wax that is used for braces, you can place it over the sharp edge until you get to the dentist.

5. Never, ever “glue” your crown back onto your tooth. Not only is glue not safe in the mouth, but you make our job more difficult when we have to try to remove the “glued” crown without causing further damage to the tooth or to surrounding teeth. Some patients have also been known to use sticky gums or foods to “glue” a crown in place. Not only do you run the risk of the crown being lost or swallowed, you are providing food for cavity-causing bacteria to further damage your tooth.

6. Same goes for any temporary cements that can sometimes be found in pharmacies. Our concern is that any re-cementation would be very temporary at best and could still leave you at risk for swallowing, choking, aspirating or the crown falling out and being lost. Additionally, self-cementing could cause your bite to be off, which in turn, may cause complications and harm to other teeth. Use these drug store cements or denture adhesive at your own risk!

7. You can still eat, but should chew on the opposite side of the mouth from where your crown fell out. Choose softer foods and avoid those that are sharp or extreme in temperature.

8. As for brushing your teeth, you should try to keep the tooth that was crowned as clean as possible to avoid added irritation, food impaction and plaque/debris buildup. You will want to brush gently with a very soft toothbrush and rinse with warm temperature water.

9. See your dentist as soon as possible. Teeth move when they are not supported by adjacent teeth or biting against opposing teeth. Delaying treatment will cause your existing tooth to shift and your crown will likely no longer fit the new tooth position.

Severe toothache?

Toothaches are considered one of the worst pains you can experience! Cavities, infections, sinusitis, fractures and even getting something caught between your teeth can cause a lot of discomfort. It is very important to understand that pain caused by an infection should be attended to right away as infection can spread to other parts of your body. Obviously, getting to the dentist as soon as possible is recommended, but how can you find some comfort before your appointment?

 

Your at home steps:

1. If you suspect that something is stuck under your gums or between your teeth, try flossing the area gently to remove the offending item, but still see your dentist to examine the area and ensure that there isn’t a more serious issue developing.
2. You may also find relief rinsing your mouth with warm salt water
3. Applying a cold compress along the facial side of the injury in a 10 minute on, 10 minute off fashion may give you additional relief.
4. DO NOT place aspirin directly on your tooth as it contains an acid that is strong enough to burn your gums and other soft tissues in your mouth.
5. Call your dentist

Tooth knocked out?

A whole tooth (crown and root) that has been knocked out (avulsed) can begin to die within 30 minutes so it is essential that you get to a dentist immediately. The chances of successful re-implantation decreases the longer you wait for treatment. If any other injuries sustained during injury are minor and do not require immediate medical attention, then get to a dentist as soon as possible. Have someone call them to explain what has happened and that you are on your way. If you have any doubt as to whether or not any other injuries sustained are serious, go to the nearest emergency department immediately. You should bring the tooth with you in a cup of cow’s milk just in case there is dental personnel on staff that can treat you while your other injuries are being attended to.

Your at home steps:

1. Only handle the tooth by the crown portion NOT the root so that you do not further damage the root’s attachment fibres. If the root has debris on it try to find a cup and fill it with some cow’s milk or water. Holding the crown, place the root portion of the tooth into the cup of liquid and wiggle the tooth back and forth to try to loosen and slough away the debris from the root surface. Do this ONLY if the root is dirty and do not scrub or use soup.
2. After cleaning, try to put the tooth back into the socket and hold it in place. If it is a child, adult supervision is critical so that they do not swallow the tooth. With a crying, flailing child, this can be near impossible, so use your discretion.
3. If you can’t place it back into the socket, then place it into a glass of cow’s milk or even the injured person’s saliva. Milk contains proteins, antibacterial substances and sugars to help the cells of the tooth and it’s surrounding tissues
4. Keep the tooth moist at all times.
5. There is also a kit available online called  Save-A-Tooth. Find it here through Amazon
6. If there is bleeding, use a moistened gauze or clean fabric to stop any bleeding. No need to clean up around the face; you want to disturb the area as little as possible.
7. If you can not get to your dentist, go to the nearest dental office that is open.

 

 

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Loose tooth?

If you have sustained an injury that causes your tooth to loosen but NOT fall out you should:

Your at home steps:

1. Leave the tooth alone and do not put pressure on it.
2. If you begin to swell, apply a cold compress along the facial side of the injury in a 10 minute on, 10 minute off fashion.
3. You may also want to take an anti-inflammatory to help control any swelling and relieve pain.
4. Call your dentist.

 

Jaw injury?

If you suspect that you have sustained an injury to your jaw, you will need to proceed to your nearest ER or urgent care with an x-ray department.

Your “on-the-way” steps:

1. Apply a cold compress to the injured area.
2. Keep your jaw as still as possible
3. You may also want to take an anti-inflammatory to help control any swelling and relieve pain.
4. Many ERs do not have any dental personnel on staff, so you will need to see your dentist after you are discharged so that they can evaluate the area further for any dental damage such as broken teeth/roots, severed nerves, tooth socket widening, bone fragments, etc.

 

Suspect an abscess?

Dental abscesses can be life-threatening! Because abscesses are serious infections that can damage your oral health and spread to other parts of the body, you need to seek medical attention immediately! Even if the pain or swelling subsides, you still need to see your dentist right away as this type of infection does not go away without treatment. Some of the signs and symptoms associated with a gum or tooth infection include:

  • swelling
  • sever and/or radiating pain
  • foul odour
  • fever
  • tender or swollen lymph nodes
  • earache, headache, sinus pain
  • white pimple on gum
  • trouble breathing or swallowing
  • fatigue

Your at home care steps:

1. Do not try to break open or pop any pimple on your gum
2. Rinse with warn salt water
3. Take an anti-inflammatory to help control any swelling and relieve pain.
4. Call your dentist.

 

Prevention

It has been our experience that most dental emergencies tend to be problems that had been growing for a while and have decided to show up just in time to ruin your good night sleep, weekend, holiday or vacation! This is why we always recommend preventative dental care every 6 months as the best way to detect and treat dental problems while they are usually small and simple to repair. Every year, we include a few days over the holidays to remain open in case you or family and friends need our help or need to complete any outstanding dental treatment before the end of the year.

 


Rather than researching home remedies online or taking advice from friends or friends, call your dentist first.
Only they can offer you the safest, “specific to you” advice on what you can do at home.

 


 

 

Yours in Better Dental Health,
The Your Smile Dental Care team
(905) 576-4537
(416) 783-3533
www.yoursmiledentalcare.com


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How often should you go to the dentist?

Why should I see a dentist if my teeth don’t hurt?

Your Smile is important and the health of your teeth has an impact on your overall health. But what if your teeth feel and look great to you?

Many people still believe that unless they are experiencing pain or have broken a tooth, it’s not necessary to see a dentist for regular examinations, but in a healthy mouth you shouldn’t be feeling any pain or sensitivity with your teeth!

 


“Pain should not be the only factor that makes you decide to go to the dentist.”


 

The fact is, dental pain is usually a warning that you have left an undetected problem too long.

Each tooth has a soft inner core consisting of blood vessels, lymphatic tissue and a nerve center. It plays an important role in the growth and development of the tooth, but once the tooth comes into the mouth, it is the lifeline that brings nutrients to the tooth and also sends out sensory signals in response to trauma and disease.

If you have ever broken a tooth or have had a painful cavity, you know the pain signals that your nerve sends out as a warning! However, it is actually located far enough away from the tooth’s outer surface that by the time an advancing cavity reaches the nerve it is usually too late to repair the problem with a simple fix.

The fact is, many oral disease are silent. We usually think that if our teeth are “quiet” that they are healthy, but you have to treat your oral health as you would your overall health.

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Regular maintenance check-up exams allows us to catch and manage the early signs of disease, before they become bigger, more complicated issues. At Your Smile Dental Care, we are here to help our patients restore their smiles to optimal dental health so that their future focus can be on prevention! We think that by encouraging our patients to maintain regular check-ups and cleanings and teaching them how to prevent dental problems before they occur is time well spent.

How often should you be going to the dentist?

That depends!

Our recommendations are based on your own individual, “specific to you”  oral health, medical conditions and lifestyle habits. Maintaining regular professional dental care allows us to monitor and evaluate your oral health and advise you accordingly.

Some people see us twice a year for their regular check-ups and cleanings, while others, who have more tartar build-up or who are at a higher risk for cavities and gum disease, need more frequent visits. It is important to understand that there are many changes in our lives that can impact our oral health and change the schedule of our dental visits.

 


“Even if you maintain an excellent oral care routine and always have good check-ups, you still need to continue a proactive attitude to help ensure that you and your dentist can always stay on top of things.”


 

And, it is especially important to take care of your teeth and seek professional dental care if you are in one of the following high risk groups below:

  • smoke or use tobacco products
  • are pregnant
  • have diabetics
  • have current gum disease
  • have a weak immune system
  • tend to get cavities or build up plaque
  • suffer from *dry mouth (see below)
  • have limited dexterity
  • have poor dietary habits
  • Snack frequently or sip a beverage other than water all day
  • have bulimia or acid reflux

*Dry Mouth: If you suffer from dry mouth your oral health may be at risk. People can develop dry mouth for a number if reasons, especially if they have:

  • diseases, such as bulimia, Sjögren’s syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis, diabetes mellitus or pernicious anemia, that alter the flow rate or content of saliva,
  • are receiving chemotherapy with drugs that cause xerostomia
  • are receiving radiation therapy directed to the head or neck.

 

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Early Detection

Knowing that here are also a number of oral health problems that can exist before you even begin to have symptoms will better help you understand why seeing your dentist regularly is so important for your oral health. We want to catch and treat problems early before they become more complicated.

If you’ve put off regular dental care – for whatever reason – do not delay any further. Your Smile is important!

 

 

Yours in Better Dental Health,
The Your Smile Dental Care team
(905) 576-4537
(416) 783-3533
www.yoursmiledentalcare.com

 


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Lost or Broken Dental Cap (Crown)

Hey, if the crown fits…

At Your Smile Dental Care, we recommend dental crowns when a weakened tooth needs added support and strength. And, although we used a special type of dental cement to permanently adhere the crown to the underlying tooth, dental caps have been know to fall off.

A dental crown may come loose or fall out for a number of reasons:

 

1. Cavities

If it is not a dental implant crown, then you still have your natural tooth underneath the crown. Like your other teeth, it is still susceptible to cavities if you are not meticulous about your home care or in attending regular professional cleanings. If part of your tooth gets destroyed by dental decay, then the crown may no longer fit snugly around your tooth. Bacterial plaque and its damaging acid continues to seep in where this protective seal between the tooth and the cap has been breached, further destroying tooth tissue. As the tooth continues to break down, the crown will become loose and eventually fall out. Sometimes the crown even comes off with the tooth still inside. Usually still fixable, but it sure makes patients say, “Yikes!”

This is why dental visits are so important! Regular visits allow us to monitor the health and fit of your dental crowns so that we can catch problems before they become bigger issues – like losing a crown.

 

2. Grinding

Don’t be surprised if you are not even aware that you grind or clench your teeth – most people aren’t! You may wake up with sore teeth and jaws, have loose teeth, have chips or fractures in some teeth, or  experience tooth pain or sensitivity. The incredibly strong forces that are put on your teeth when grinding or clenching can cause dental crowns to become loosened or even chip/break. Dr. Sam Axelrod advises patients who clench and grind to wear a custom-made guard over their teeth at night for added protection. A nightguard will put your teeth into proper bite and protect your teeth and dental crowns from wear and damage.

 

3. Injury or Trauma

Some injuries can be so severe that a crown gets knocked right off a tooth. It may be that the dental crown was already loose and all it needed was a sudden jarring hit to knock it off!

 

4. Disintegrating Cement

Gradually, over time, the cement that holds the crown in place can break down and dissolve. This leaves the bond between the existing tooth structure and crown weak and the crown simply falls out. Again, you dentist will monitor the seal at your dental check-ups to ensure that the integrity of the cement is still intact.

 

What to Do…

It is understandable why most patients panic when their crown falls out. They know that their tooth is no longer protected by the crown and they may even begin to feel some sensitivity to hot and cold food, biting down, tooth brushing or breathing in air.

 

Take these 10 steps to increase the likelihood of saving your crown and tooth:

1. Wrap the crown in a piece of tissue or gauze then place it into a plastic container.

2. Do not attempt to clean off the crown or it may drop onto the floor or down the drain!

3. Rinse your mouth with warm water and spit out into a cup or bowl. This is done to ensure that there isn’t more pieces of tooth of crown in your mouth that you could swallow or aspirate. Retrieve any pieces you think may be a piece of tooth or crown and place in the plastic container.

4. Sometimes, your tooth is left with a sharp edge  when a crown falls off. Do not try to file it down yourself! If you happen to have any orthodontic wax that is used for braces, you can place it over the sharp edge until you get to the dentist.

5. Never, ever “glue” your crown back onto your tooth. Not only is glue not safe in the mouth, but you make our job more difficult when we have to try to remove the “glued” crown without causing further damage to the tooth or surrounding teeth. Some patients have also been known to use sticky gums or foods to “glue” a crown in place. Not only do you run the risk of the crown being lost or swallowed, you are providing food for cavity-causing bacteria to further damage your tooth.

6. Same goes for any temporary cements that can sometimes be found in pharmacies. Our concern is that any re-cementation would be very temporary at best and could still leave you at risk for swallowing, choking, aspirating or the crown falling out and being lost. Additionally, self-cementing could cause your bite to be off, which in turn, may cause complications and harm to other teeth. Use these drug store cements or denture adhesives at your own risk!

7. Rather than researching home remedies online or taking advice from friends or friends, call your dentist first. Only they can offer you the safest, “specific to you” advice on what you can do at home.

8. You can still eat, but should chew on the opposite side of the mouth from where you crown fell out. Choose softer foods and avoid those that are sharp or extreme in temperature.

9. As for brushing your teeth, you should try to keep the tooth that was crowned as clean as possible to avoid added irritation, food impaction and plaque/debris buildup. You will want to brush gently with a very soft toothbrush and rinse with warm temperature water.

10. See your dentist as soon as possible. Teeth move when they are not supported by adjacent teeth or biting against opposing teeth. Delaying treatment will cause your existing tooth to shift and your crown will likely no longer fit the new tooth position.

 

Swallowed or Aspirated Crown

What happens if you accidently swallow a crown?

Usually a crown is small enough that it just goes through the digestive tract without complication. However, there is always a risk that the crown can become stuck in the throat obstruction of the airway. You would begin immediate action as you would with any other type of choking. See here for Choking Victim instructions.

Aspiration is an entirely more serious matter than involves the crown being accidentally “breathed” into the respiratory tract during swallowing, coughing or hiccupping. In a case like this, you will need to be evaluated immediately at your local hospital emergency or the nearest urgent care with a radiology department. A chest x-ray will determine the location of the crown and the attending physician will arrange for prompt retrieval to prevent further complications.

 

If you have lost your crown or are facing any kind of dental emergency, please give us a call right away. At Your Smile Dental Care, Dr. Sam Axelrod and his team of caring professional will be happy to answer your questions and make all possible arrangements to help you.

 

 

Yours in Better Dental Health,
The Your Smile Dental Care team
(905) 576-4537
(416) 783-3533
www.yoursmiledentalcare.com


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Medications and YOUR SMILE

Are Medications Ruining YOUR SMILE?

We are seeing a growing number of patients that are experiencing dryness of their mouths and a number of dental issues associated with this dryness.

In fact, some dryness of the mouth can be so severe that it is not just uncomfortable, it becomes very painful. Additionally, there are times when the throat is so parched, that a person can’t even swallow.

The Importance of Saliva

You may not have given much thought about saliva, other than the fact that the mouth is moistened by it, but the production of saliva is an important process in the mouth. It not only moistens, but it helps control the levels of  bacteria and fungi in our mouths, aids in chewing, tasting and digestion, cleans, protects and remineralizes teeth, and neutralizes our mouth after acid attacks.

Naturally, when a patient complains about a decrease in the quality and quantity of their saliva, we become concerned.

The condition of persistent dry mouth is called Xerostomia and it is a common side effect of many of the prescription and non-prescription medications we may be taking as well as a manifestation of certain diseases such as Aids, anemia, stroke, hypertension, cystic fibrosis, arthritis, Parkinson’s disease, cancer, diabetes and a condition called Sjogren’s syndrome.

Your saliva output can also be damaged by medical treatments such as radiation and chemotherapy, smoking/tobacco products, menopause and dehydration from illnesses, bulimia, excessive sweating, diarrhea, blood loss and burns.

Because our bodies are about 60% water, even a small drop in hydration can affect us immediately, let alone long term. There are over 500 medications that list dry mouth as a possible side effect.

Check out the Colgate Oral Care webpage where the classes of prescription drugs that affect the salivary glands are listed.

 

 

 

If you suspect that you are experiencing dry mouth, speak to your family physician and even your pharmacist as soon as possible. They can, hopefully, find a solution that is right for you.

As dentists, we can recommend that you:

  • Restore any dental issues that have arisen due to dry mouth.
  • Ensure that you are brushing at least 3 times/day and flossing before bed.
  • Limiting your meals to 3-4/day and spacing them out 4-5 hours apart
  • Reduce the amount of sugar you intake
  • Ask your doctor to suggest the vitamins supplements that are right just for you
  • Choose a product from your local pharmacy for help with dry mouth. This includes, sprays, rinses and special toothpastes. You may have to try a few until you find one that works best for you.
  • Chew sugar-less gum or suck on sugar-free lozenges
  • Drink more water
  • Using a humidifier in your bedroom at night
  • Use a fluoride rinse at bedtime
  • If you use a mouth rinse choose an alcohol/peroxide-free product
  • Avoid weather and activity that causes excessive sweating
  • Use a nasal spray if you are experiencing sinusitis
  • Avoid tobacco, alcohol, caffeine, carbonated beverages and highly acidic juices
  • Avoid dry food such as crackers and toast
  • Avoid very salty foods

Unfortunately, if dryness of the mouth persists and is left unchecked, it can lead to tooth decay, mouth sores and gum problems. If you would like more information about dry mouth, please follow the link below:

 

 

 

Yours in Better Dental Health,
The Your Smile Dental Care team
(905) 576-4537
(416) 783-3533
www.yoursmiledentalcare.com


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Botox and TMJ?

When Laughing Hurts…

Are you experiencing jaw pain, headaches, or can hear/feel clicking sounds when you open your mouth? Does your jaw, “pop or lock up?

You may have a condition that is commonly referred to as TMJ – Temporal Mandibular Joint. While the TMJ is an actual anatomical part of your head, this acronym has become an umbrella term to describe a painful dysfunction of area.

The TMJ is the area where your lower jaw fits or mates with the temporal bone of your skull. It acts like a sliding hinge allowing you to open and close your mouth and move it side to side. This area is a complex structure of ligaments, muscle, joint capsule, articular disc and the actual 2 bone surfaces: the temporal bone and mandible.

Impairment of the TMJ can occur with osteoarthritis, injury, wear, misaligned bite, bruxism (teeth grinding/clenching) and even poor posture. It can involve the muscles surrounding the bones, the joint itself or both. Pain and discomfort can be a temporary problem or can last many years.

Signs and Symptoms can include:

  • Sore jaws
  • Toothaches
  • Headaches
  • Earaches
  • Dizziness/Vertigo
  • Neck/Shoulder pain
  • Trouble chewing
  • Jaw thrusting
  • Popping, clicking or grating feeling/sound in joint
  • Facial swelling
  • Jaw locks up or gets stuck when opening or closing mouth.
  • Tinnitus  (ringing in ears)

 

Diagnosis

If you suspect that you may have a TMJ issue bring it to the attention of your dentist right away. Your dentist will perform a clinical exam of your dental structures and face, check for abnormal movements of the jaw, assess your bite, listen for sounds in the TMJ area, and discuss your health history.

For some patients, because the condition is minor, treatment may be as simple as a bite agjustment or a bite guard to place on the teeth into a more correct position and lessen the effects of bruxism. For others, it may involve further testing such as x-rays, MRI, and/or a CT scan. A referral to a Specialist may also become necessary when pinpointing the exact source of TMJ problems is difficult to determine.

Oftentimes, dealing with TMJ issues involves a multi-phased approach starting with minor adjustments and treatments, and if necessary, increasing in levels of intervention. In conjunction with any treatment recommendations, your dentist may also recommend the use of muscle relaxants, anti-anxiety and/or anti-inflammatory medication, jaw exercise and the use of hot/cold compresses

What Can You Do?

In the meantime, there are some things you can do to help alleviate your discomfort before, during and after treatment:

  • Switch to softer foods
  • Avoid opening your mouth very wide including yawning, yelling and singing
  • Keeping chewing to a minimum
  • Avoid gum chewing
  • Gently massage the jaw, TMJ and temple to stimulate circulation, relax the muscles and relieve discomfort and tightness.
  • Practice good posture. You can buy a simple posture brace to help.

Give your jaw at rest by:

  • Keeping your teeth slightly apart. Separating your teeth with your tongue can be helpful.
  • Avoid clenching/grinding movements (often subconscious habit, but try to be more aware)
  • Avoid resting your head/chin on your hand to relieve pressure on your jaw.

BOTOX: The alternative treatment for TMJ

 

TMJ disorder can be a very debilitating condition, but there is hope. Oftentimes, it is triggered by muscle spasms and bruxism which tends to be a stress response. Modern dentistry is now turning to what is commonly thought to be just a cosmetic enhancement – Botox.

Botox is now used therapeutically in many medically compromised patients. For TMJ issues, it is used as a non-surgical approach to weaken the muscle involved with jaw movement to put an end to spasms. This, in turn, allows the entire anatomy associated with TMJ disorder to get the rest and healing it needs. It is usually repeated every 3-4 months with the hope, that over time, inflammation will subside and the anatomy will get the rest and healing it needs to alleviate the condition or any contributing, destructive habits.

Our friendly staff are happy to answer any questions you have about your TMJ problem or any other dental issue you may be experiencing. With proper care, you need not suffer any longer.

 

 

Yours in Better Dental Health,
Your Smile Dental Care Team 
(905) 576-4537
(416)783-3533
www.yoursmiledentalcare.com